Alsace Pinot Gris

One day I was doing wine tasting at a wine shop, one lady customer walked in and quickly saw the brand bottle she wanted. A green bottle of Alsace Pinot Gris. She was saying, “that is my favorite wine. Now I will get two bottles.” For her, it was an excitement to get her wine. I was prepared for her to taste the New Zealand Pinot Gris. She was in a rush and she is not interested to taste the New Zealand version. My working partner said afterwards, “I do not like people who do not taste different wines.” A refuse to taste something different! I think there must be some reasons behind that.
1. I know the wine variety and style I like, I do not bother to try others.
2. New Zealand Pinot Gris, Ido not expect them to be better than the one I like.
3. New Zealand wines are so expensive, a New Zealand Pinot Gris could be more expensive than an Alsatian one.
4. I do not feel alike to change my taste.
5. Maybe another time, but not now.
Brand impression comes not just a wine we familiar, but also from a place where it is from.
Sauvignon Blanc from Marlborough has been a star in the world. The milestone of its developments was showing in a few wines. And we also have Marlborough Pinot Gris. When we talk about Pinot Gris, we would think about the Pinot Grigio from Italy and also Pinot Gris of the Alsace version. The wine from the chill area such as the North-Easter part of Italy has a great depth. It could be creamy with oak aging. Alsace version has a warmer notes, while the Marlborough version has more acidity. Considering the wine growing cost, I am thinking why we do not have Nelson Pinot Gris? Where it is warmer at the daytime and the coastal area could provide the coldness in the evening. If we want a dry style, we can give it more oily texture by second fermentation and aging. As the cost of wine making in New Zealand is high, we may consider the high end version of Pinot Gris from Marlborough and Central Otago, and a cheaper version from Nelson and northland of Auckland.
Personally I do like Pinot Gris, it is a middle man between Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay.

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